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Here we take a look at what Thrive Learning and Technology Officer Freddie said about project Superbloom during their interview with Bill Buckley on BBC Berkshire.

Over 1500 schools signed up nationally to request free wildflower seeds - a great way to start the conversation about biodiversity and the need for pollinating plants which attract insects. More importantly the project has promoted why being outside in nature is so good for you.

Freddie went on to explain that a broad range of primary school aged children engaged with the project because the schools were keen to be involved.

“It’s also a step in learning where our food comes from. We can learn how things grow, we can learn how we create and support our communities and it's also a really good opportunity to develop hope, perseverance and patience; Skills that they can transfer into other areas of their lives.

It also gives children the opportunity to be away from the classroom within their education. Hopefully this project will be the start of a long journey in bringing gardening and growing into schools.”

Thrive’s Superbloom event used a tried and tested approach, enabling teachers to explore several ways in which gardens and gardening could be used in the national curriculum to improve pupils’ wellbeing and resilience. Pupils from Isebrook School in Kettering said they were overjoyed to be part of the project.

“We first started with a brainstorming session with all the students that have chosen horticulture as their option. Suggestions included Willow Weaving but then we incorporated Superbloom into a bigger story which included sunflowers that tie in with the bees and pollinators."

Superbloom workshop at Kensington Palace hits the mark

Children and their parents had the time of their lives during Thrive's interactive workshop at Kensington Palace, which was part of the Superbloom project.

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